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« Four ways to make yourself indispensable: break rules, make change, ship it and impress | Main | Twitter hires a PR person: Sean Garrett joins as VP Comms »

February 09, 2010

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So few businesses use an e-mail address with a gmail domain. How can businesses take advantage? Maybe I'm misunderstanding the entire thing? Thanks for any clarification.

@Amy - I think this would be aimed at giving business that use Gmail for their business email accounts a way of using internal 'Buzz' as a comms tool (I know only a handful, but there are many)

Interesting. However it sounds like someone who does not already use Gmail and keeps media contacts in Excel (not an address book) would have a lot of set-up to do before this becomes useful.

So if one has a personal yahoo account (me), but a corporate email account (me) - and these are the two that I use the most by far - am I to now (because of the great GoogleBuzz) supposed to drop my personal yahoo, swap everything to gmail (yes, I do have a gmail account I sometimes use)?

But meanwhile, I'm well-connected on Twitter AND FB. So WHY would I make this swap?

Drew - your point: "Search engines will find content much more easily than with content on Twitter" is very valid.

I checked out the HTML for our Buzz and Google Profile and ran a quick spider simulation over it. (I have "Buzzed" about it if you want to read more detail) The important thing is that there dose not appear to be any "no follow" tags within the code. On Twitter these tags exist and prevent search engines crawling any links (except on Twitter Mobile).

This is a big difference when comparing Buzz & Twitter and looking at SEO/online PR issues.

Also - by using Buzz to republish your Tweets - the "no follow" tag seems to be taken out (at least I can't see any - but I'm no programmer).

If you are interested in building links to improve your own or a client's search engine rankings - this has got to be a bonus as you are effectively creating relevant content and links.

The question is whether Google will start considering that some Buzz content is being used unfairly in this way?

I guess they will have an algorithm up their sleeves!

Keep buzzing/tweeting/feeding friends.

Andrew

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