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« How not to pitch PR stories to Monocle | Main | New team, new clients and a new addition »

October 06, 2009

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eerm, so as per the headline, what are your thoughts?

In theory the FTC rules will hopefully make this practice a whole lot more transparent. However, as you mention the whole process of enforcing (monitoring and prosecuting) will be very difficult in practice. So whilst it is certainly a step in the right direction, I must admit I am sceptical.

Whilst I'm a big believe in transparency when it comes to this kind of thing, this all seems a little heavy handed.

I think that when bloggers or tweeps are endorsing a product, they probably should say whether they are benefiting from it. But I think that comes down to ethics and shouldn't necessarily be regulated like this.

Also, what about agencies like Sydney guys Naked, who had everyone in an uproar about the 'Man in the Jacket' advertising campaign? Would they be fined too?

hmmm... not sure if this is a positive step or not...

@lurkmoophy We've seen similar regulation passed here recently so I think this may follow a similar course

@ben true, but it'll need some test cases for illustration

@robin ?! In short, less of the freebies-for-buzz type PR here as well as the US

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